Murder and Serious Offences in WA

Murder in WA

  • Murder is a Schedule II offence under section 279 of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • This offence is a strictly indictable offence. It must be finalised in the Supreme Court, but still commences in the Supreme Magistrates Court. The maximum penalty is life imprisonment.
  • If you plead guilty or are found guilty, the court can impose a sentence of life imprisonment and set a non-parole period.

If you have been charged with Murder, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. That you are the person who did the things asserted constituting the offence
  2. That you killed a person
  3. The killing of that person was unlawful
  4. That you intended to cause the death of that person or intended to cause a bodily injury of such nature to endanger or likely endanger that person’s life

A lawyer will meticulously analyse the evidence presented by the prosecutor, craft a robust defence strategy tailored to your case, challenge the prosecution’s case, and advocate for your rights throughout the legal proceedings. They will explore all possible avenues for defence, such as establishing mitigating circumstances, casting doubt on intent or unlawful killing, and ensuring fair treatment under the law to secure the best possible outcome for you.

What are the circumstances of murder?

Section 279(1) of the Criminal Code provides three circumstances in which an unlawful killing amounts to murder. These circumstances are:

  1.  if the accused intended to cause the death of the person killed or another person; or
  2. if the accused intended to cause a bodily injury of such a nature as to endanger or be likely to endanger, the life of the person killed or another person; or
  3. if the death was caused by an act done in the prosecution of an unlawful purpose and the act was likely to endanger human life.

What does ‘unlawfully killing’ and ‘insanity’ mean?

The killing of a person will not be unlawful if the accused is not criminally responsible for the killing having regard to s 27 of the Code (insanity). When a defence of insanity is raised under s 27 of the Code to a charge of murder, it is necessary to decide if the accused is criminally responsible for causing the death of the deceased before deciding if the State has proved that the accused had one of the requisite intentions for murder. The issue of insanity falls to be determined before the issue of intent.

What does ‘intended to cause death’ mean?

The prosecution must prove that an accused had the relevant intention to kill the deceased or someone else which imports a wholly subjective test.

What does ‘intended to cause a bodily injury’ mean?

The prosecution must prove the accused’s subjective intent to cause bodily injury and establish objectively that the injuries endangered or were likely to endanger life. The test is partly subjective and partly objective.

What does it mean by ‘intended to endanger life’?

The test in s 279(1)(c) of the Criminal Code is objective. The jury, or a judge sitting alone, must determine whether the act was “of such a nature as to be likely to endanger human life. The word “likely” in this context is meant to convey the notion of a substantial or real chance as distinct from what is a mere possibility.

What defences to the charge of murder may be available?

There are a number of defences that may be available to you if you have been charged, including:

  • Self-defence
  • Reasonable use of force to prevent home invasion.
  • Accident, unwilled act, duress, extraordinary emergency or mistake of fact.

Some partial defences which may reduce the charge from murder to manslaughter include:

  • Intoxication
  • Insanity

However, insanity does not lead to an acquittal in the ordinary sense and can lead to custody orders being made and indefinite detention in a psychiatric facility.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty, will a conviction be recorded?

A. If you’re facing a murder charge, it’s essential to understand that a conviction is highly likely if you plead or are found guilty. The severity of the sentence will hinge on various factors including case specifics, personal background, and criminal history.

Q. Should I plead guilty to a murder charge?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person alleged to have committed the offence
  • whether you killed a person
  • whether that killing was unlawful
  • whether you intended to kill that person
  • whether you were acting in self-defence or have another available defence

You may accept that you committed murder but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge such as manslaughter or unlawful assault causing death.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of a murder charge?

A. A person who is convicted of murder must be given life imprisonment unless:

  1. that sentence would be clearly unjust given the circumstances of the offence and the person; and
  2. the person is unlikely to be a threat to the safety of the community when released form imprisonment.

In this case the person is liable to imprisonment for 20 years.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to persuade the court to reduce the length of the gaol sentence or non-parole period.

Manslaughter

  • Manslaughter is an offence under section 280 of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA). This offence is a Schedule II offence.
  • This offence is a strictly indictable offence. It must be finalised in the Supreme Court, but still commences in the Supreme Magistrates Court. The maximum penalty is life imprisonment.
  • If you plead guilty, or are found guilty, it is highly likely you will receive a sentence of full-time imprisonment.

If you have been charged with manslaughter, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. That you are the person who did the things asserted constituting the offence
  2. That you killed a person
  3. The death was reasonably foreseeable
  4. The killing of that person was unlawful
  5. That you intended to cause the death of that person or intended to a cause a bodily injury of such nature to endanger or likely endanger that person’s life

What does the term ‘kill’ mean?

Any person who causes the death of another, directly or indirectly, by any means whatever, is deemed to have killed that other person. It is unlawful to kill any person unless such killing is authorised or justified or excused by law.

What does ‘unlawfully kills’ and ‘insanity’ mean?

The killing of a person will not be unlawful if the accused is not criminally responsible for the killing having regard to s 27 of the Code (insanity). When a defence of insanity is raised under s 27 of the Code to a charge of manslaughter, it is necessary to decide if the accused is criminally responsible for causing the death of the deceased.

What defences to a charge of manslaughter are available?

In navigating the complexities of manslaughter charges and potential defences, enlisting the support of a reputable lawyer service is crucial. There are a number of defences that may be available to you if you have been charged, including:

  • Reasonable self-defence
  • Reasonable use of force to prevent home invasion.
  • Accident, unwilled act, duress, extraordinary emergency or mistake of fact.

Some partial defences that may be available include:

  • Intoxication
  • Insanity

However, insanity does not lead to an acquittal in the ordinary sense and can lead to custody orders being made and indefinite detention in a psychiatric facility.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is very likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Should I plead guilty to a charge of manslaughter?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person alleged to have committed the offence
  • whether you killed a person
  • whether that killing was unlawful
  • whether you were acting in self-defence or have another available defence

You may accept that you committed manslaughter but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge such as unlawful assault causing death.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of 

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is very likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for manslaughter is life imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol, or to persuade the court to reduce the length of the gaol sentence.

Kidnapping

  • Kidnapping is a Schedule II offence under section 332 of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • This offence is strictly indictable. It must be finalised in the District Court but still commences in the Magistrates’ Court. The maximum penalty is 20 years imprisonment.
  • Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is very likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

If you have been charged with kidnapping, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. You are the person who is alleged to do the things that constitute the offence
  2. That you detained the complainant
  3. That when the complainant was detained, you did so with an intent to gain a benefit, or cause a detriment, prevent or hinder the doing of an act by the complainant who was lawfully entitled to do that act, or compel the doing of an act by the complainant who is lawfully entitled to abstain from doing that act.
  4. That the accused intended to gain the benefit, cause the detriment, prevent the complainant from doing an act, or compel the complainant to do the act by threat or demand.

What does it mean by ‘detain’?

A person who deprives another person of personal liberty by:

  • taking the other person away or enticing the other person away; or
  • confining or detaining the other person in any place; or
  • in any other manner

is said to detain that other person.

What does it mean by ‘threat’?

Threat means a threat to kill, injure, endanger or cause harm or detriment to any person.

In proceedings for an offence against this section, alleging or proving that a threat or demand was actually made is unnecessary.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is very likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Q. Should I plead guilty to a charge of kidnapping?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person accused
  • whether you detained the complainant
  • whether you intended to gain a benefit, cause a detriment, prevent or hinder or compel the doing of an act

You may accept that you committed the offence but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge such as  deprivation of liberty.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of 

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is very likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for kidnapping is 20 years imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol, or to persuade the court to reduce the length of the gaol sentence. Your lawyer will tirelessly advocate for your rights and interests throughout the legal process, striving to achieve the most favourable outcome possible given the circumstances.

Deprivation of Liberty

  • Deprivation of liberty is an offence under section 333 of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA). This offence is a Schedule II offence.
  • This offence is a strictly indictable offence. It must be finalised in the District Court, but still commences in the Magistrates Court. The maximum penalty is 14 years imprisonment if the offence is committed in circumstances of aggravation otherwise 10 years imprisonment.
  • Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.
  • It’s crucial to recognise the significance of legal representation when facing charges of deprivation of liberty.

If you have been charged with deprivation of liberty, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. You are the person accused of doing the things that constitute the offence
  2. You detain another person
  3. You unlawfully detained another person.

What does the term ‘detain’ mean?

A person who deprives another person of personal liberty by:

  • taking the other person away or enticing the other person away; or
  • confining or detaining the other person in any place; or
  • in any other manner

is said to detain that other person.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Q. Should I plead guilty to deprivation of liberty?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the accused person
  • whether you detained another person
  • whether you detained that person unlawfully

You may accept that you committed the offence but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of deprivation of liberty?

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is very likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for deprivation of liberty is 14 years imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol, or to persuade the court to reduce the length of the gaol sentence.

Threats to Kill

  • Threats to kill is an offence under section 338B(1) of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • It can be dealt with in either the Magistrates Court or the District Court. The maximum penalty is 14 years imprisonment, however if dealt with in the Magistrates Court the maximum penalty is 3 years imprisonment and/or a fine of $36,000.
  • If you plead guilty, or are found guilty, a number of different sentences can be imposed. It is likely that a criminal conviction will be recorded.

If you have been charged with threats to kill, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. You are the person who is alleged to do the things that constitute the offence.
  2. That you made a threat
  3. That the threat was a statement or behaviour that expressly constitutes, or may reasonably be regarded as constituting a threat to kill
  4. That the threatened killing was unlawful

What does ‘making a threat’ mean?

The threat may be “a statement or behaviour that expressly constitutes, or may reasonably be regarded as constituting, a threat” to do various things.

The words alleged to constitute a threat must constitute, objectively speaking, a declaration of an intention to kill. The meaning of words may depend on the circumstances in which they are used, and any task of construction will ordinarily involve an examination of those circumstances.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty of a threat to kill, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors. A lawyer can play a pivotal role in helping you navigate a threat to kill charge and potentially avoid a conviction. They will meticulously assess the details of your case, explore all available legal defences, and advocate on your behalf to mitigate the severity of the charges.

Q. Should I plead guilty to threatening to kill?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person accused
  • whether you made a threat
  • the threat was a statement or behaviour that expressly constitutes, or may reasonably be regarded as constituting a threat to kill
  • whether you were acting unlawfully

You may accept that you committed the offence but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge such as threats under section 338B(1).
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of threatening to kill someone?

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is possible that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for threats to kill is 14 years imprisonment, however, the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol.

Creating False Apprehension

  • Creating false apprehension as to the existence of a threat or danger is an offence under section 338C of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • It can be dealt with in either the Magistrates Court or the District Court. The maximum penalty is 14 years imprisonment, however if dealt with in the Magistrates Court the maximum penalty is 3 years imprisonment.
  • If you plead guilty, or are found guilty, a number of different sentences can be imposed. It is likely that a criminal conviction will be recorded.

If you have been charged with creating a false apprehension, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. That you are the person that is accused;
  2. That you made a statement or conveyed information;
  3. That expressly indicates or may reasonably be construed as indicating;
  4. A threat to unlawfully:
    1. gain a benefit, pecuniary or otherwise, for any person;
    2. cause a detriment, pecuniary or otherwise, to any person;
    3. prevent or hinder the doing of an act by a person who is lawfully entitled to do that act; or
    4. there is to be an intention / proposal / plan / conspiracy to unlawfully do any of the those things;
    5. or there is an intention of creating a belief / suspicion / fear that anything mentioned above is being /has been unlawfully done / attempted.
  5. That you knew the statement or information was false.

What does ‘cause a detriment’ mean?

‘Cause a detriment’ refers to inflicting harm, loss, or disadvantage upon someone. In the context of the charge of creating a false apprehension, causing a detriment could involve actions that lead to negative consequences for an individual, whether pecuniary (financial) or otherwise (such as harm to reputation, emotional distress, or interference with rights or freedoms).

What does ‘conspiracy to unlawfully do’ mean?

‘Conspiracy to unlawfully do’ refers to an agreement or plan between two or more people to commit an unlawful act. It implies that individuals have conspired or collaborated with the intention of engaging in activities that are illegal or against the law, such as plotting to cause harm, gain benefits unlawfully, or hinder lawful actions of others.

This will depend on a number of factors, including whether you accept that you caused the death of the victim.

You may accept that you caused the death of the victim, but your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecution to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge.

Alternatively, you may accept that you caused the death of the victim, but disagree with part or all of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecution to change the police facts.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Q. Should I plead guilty to creating false apprehension?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person accused
  • whether you made a statement or conveyed information
  • whether it indicated or may reasonably be construed an unlawful threat
  • whether you knew the statement or information was false

You may accept that you created a false apprehension but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of creating false apprehension?

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is possible that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for creating a false apprehension is 14 years imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol or reduce the length of the gaol sentence.

Stalking

  • Stalking is a Schedule II offence under section 338E of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • It can be dealt with in either the Magistrates Court or the District Court. The maximum penalty is 8 years imprisonment, however if dealt with in the Magistrates Court the maximum penalty is 2 years imprisonment and/or a fine of $24,000.00.
  • If you plead guilty or are found guilty, a number of different sentences can be imposed. A criminal conviction is likely to be recorded.

If you have been charged with stalking, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. That you are the person accused, or an accomplice
  2. The you pursued another
  3. That you did so with intent to intimidate that person or a third person
  4. That you did act with lawful authority

If a person who pursues another person in a manner that could reasonably be expected to intimidate, and that does in fact intimidate that person or a third person is guilty of a simple offence with a maximum penalty of imprisonment of 12 months and/or a fine of $12,000.00.

Your lawyer will dissect the prosecutor’s case, scrutinising the evidence presented and challenging each element required for conviction.

What does it mean to ‘intimidate’?

Intimidate, in relation to a person, includes —

  1. to cause physical or mental harm to the person;
  2. to cause apprehension or fear in the person;
  3. to prevent the person from doing an act that the person is lawfully entitled to do, or to hinder the person in doing such an act;
  4. to compel the person to do an act that the person is lawfully entitled to abstain from doing;

What does it mean to ‘pursue’?

Pursue, in relation to a person, includes —

  1. to repeatedly communicate with the person, whether directly or indirectly and whether in words or otherwise;
  2. to repeatedly follow the person;
  3. to repeatedly cause the person to receive unsolicited items;
  4. to watch or beset the place where the person lives or works or happens to be, or the approaches to such a place;
  5. whether or not repeatedly, to do any of the foregoing in breach of a restraining order or bail condition.

For the purpose of deciding whether an accused person has pursued another person —

  1. the accused is not to be regarded as having communicated with or followed that person on a particular occasion if it is proved by or on behalf of the accused that on that occasion the accused did not intend to communicate with or follow that person;
  2. an act by the accused on a particular occasion is not to be taken into account for the purpose of deciding whether the accused watched or beset a place where that person lived, worked or happened to be, or the approaches to such a place, if it is proved by or on behalf of the accused that on that occasion the accused did not know it was such a place.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty of stalking, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Q. Should I plead guilty to stalking someone?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including, for example:

  • whether you accept that you are the person accused
  • whether you pursued another person
  • whether you do so with intent to intimidate the person
  • whether you had lawful authority to do so

You may accept that you committed the offence but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of stalking? 

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is possible that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for stalking is 8 years imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol or reduce the length of the gaol sentence.

Burglary

  • Burglary is a Schedule II offence under section 401 of the Criminal Code 1913 (WA).
  • Depending on the circumstances of aggravation, the offence can be dealt with in either the Magistrates Court or the District Court. The maximum penalty is 20 years imprisonment; however, if dealt with in the Magistrates Court, the maximum penalty is 3 years imprisonment.
  • If you plead guilty or are found guilty, a number of different sentences can be imposed. A criminal conviction is likely to be recorded.
  • Your lawyer can offer comprehensive insights into the charge of burglary by thoroughly examining the circumstances surrounding the alleged offense, assessing the strength of the prosecution’s case, and explaining the legal complexities involved.=

If you have been charged with burglary, the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that:

  1. You are the person, or an accomplice, alleged to have committed the offence
  2. You entered or were in a place of another person
  3. That you did so without that person’s consent
  4. That at the time of entry you had an intent to commit an offence or you did commit an offence
  5. That you had no lawful right to commit these acts

What are ‘circumstances of aggravation’?

Circumstances of aggravation for burglaries means circumstances in which immediately before, during or after the commission of the offence, an accused:

  1. is or pretends to be armed with a dangerous or offensive weapon or instrument;
  2. is or pretends to be in possession of an explosive substance;
  3. is in company with another person or other persons;
  4. does bodily harm to any person;
  5. threatens to kill or injure any person;
  6. detains any person.

Another circumstance of aggravation arises where immediately before the commission of the offence, an accused knew or ought to have known that there was another person in the place.

What is ‘home burglary’?

An offence of burglary committed in respect of a place ordinarily used for human habitation.

If the offence of home burglary is committed in circumstances of aggravation (unless the only circumstance of aggravation is that the accused is in company with another person), the charge must be dealt with in the District Court of WA.

What does ‘burglary with an offence against property’ mean?

If the offence committed in the place is an offence against property and the value of the property is more than $50,000.00 the offence is not to be dealt with in the Magistrates Court.

What does it mean by ‘repeat offender’ and what happens if I’m a repeat offender?

If an accused is convicted of a home burglary and has two other convictions for home burglary at that time, they are deemed to be repeat offenders. The court must impose a minimum sentence of 2 years imprisonment and cannot suspend terms.

Q. If I plead guilty or am found guilty of burglary, will a conviction be recorded?

A. It is very likely that the court will record a conviction. The type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

Q. Should I plead guilty to a charge of burglary?

A. This will depend on a number of factors including:

  • whether you accept that you are the person alleged to have committed the offence
  • whether you entered or were in a place of another person
  • whether you had the consent of that person to enter or be in that place
  • whether you committed an offence
  • whether you had the intention to commit an offence
  • whether any of the circumstances of aggravation are true
  • whether you were acting lawfully

You may accept that you committed burglary but:

  • your lawyer may be able to persuade the prosecutor to accept a plea of guilty to a less serious charge such as trespass.
  • you may disagree with part of what police say happened. In these circumstances, your lawyer may be able to negotiate with the prosecutor to change the statement of material facts.

Q. Am I going to go to gaol if I plead guilty to or am found guilty of burglary?

A. Although there are many sentencing alternatives, it is likely that you will go to gaol if you plead guilty or are found guilty.

The maximum penalty for burglary is 20 years imprisonment, however the type of sentence you receive will depend on the facts of your case, your personal circumstances, criminal history and many other factors.

It is important that a lawyer properly prepares and presents your case to minimise the risk of you going to gaol or reduce the length of the gaol sentence.

Why Choose Hugo Law Group to Defend You

Hugo Law Group is a law firm that is focused on protecting and defending your rights. Drawing on decades of experience, our team of criminal lawyers will guide you through the legal process, providing comprehensive, honest and strategic advice – qualities that give us our renowned reputation.

Whether you want to plead not guilty, you are looking to secure the best possible sentence, or a loved one wants to apply for bail, it is essential to have an experienced team of criminal defence lawyers in your corner.

Seeking comprehensive and practical advice at an early stage will best ensure your rights and interests are protected. Our lawyers will properly prepare and present your case to assist you in getting the best possible outcome.

Contact

At Hugo Law Group, we will clearly explain what your rights and obligations are so that you can make informed decisions about how to deal with the police and the court process.

Even if you have not yet been charged with a criminal offence, you should seek advice from a lawyer at an early stage to ensure that your rights and interests are protected.

Hugo Law Group is the market leader in criminal defence law, providing exceptional representation to people facing serious criminal charges.

As leaders in criminal defence, we know that every story has two sides. We defend yours.

Get in contact with us today or feel free to call us at 02 9696 1361 (Sydney), 02 5104 9640 (Canberra), or 08 6255 6909 (Perth) and find out how we can help you.